Writer’s Guidelines

Writer’s Guidelines

InPRA readers are well-informed, intelligent individuals with a wide range of interests. But they are not necessarily specialists in international affairs. Our readers want to be provoked, surprised, and presented with memorable information and rigorous analysis. They don’t want long-winded arguments, insider jargon, narrow topics, or excessively technical writing.

The ideal InPRA article strikes a balance: It is a reference for debate among specialists, but it also engages and informs a general-interest reader. Sharp analytical thinking should complement reporting. Opinion pieces or essays should use original data, anecdotes, and wit to draw in readers.

 We look forward to hearing your ideas!

Please feel free to email submissions to editor@inpra.in

Before you pitch us an idea, keep a few things in mind:

  • Read the website. It’s the best way to get a sense of what we like, and the easiest way to avoid sending us something we’ve already covered.
  • (Hyper) Cite your work. We know you don’t have the answers to all the questions of the universe. We also know that, sometimes, you need others’ research to further your work. We’re fine with that, as long as you give them the credit they deserve— InPRA has a zero-tolerance policy for academic dishonesty and plagiarism. Additionally, InPRA believes that hypercitations are the future of web-based academia and recommends that you incorporate those into your submissions.
  • Take the road less followed. InPRA focuses on not only the underrepresented voices, but also the underrepresented ideas. We encourage submissions assessing Vanuatu’s Women’s Rights because they look at issues that might not generally be perceived as interest generating. But, that doesn’t mean we aren’t interested in the more popular issues either, we encourage you to talk about America’s decline, or the “Global” War on Terrorism—but, while being cognizant of aspects or perspectives that might generally be ignored.
  • This isn’t the place for your rants. Don’t send us articles titled, “Why America is Bad” or “Why Modi Will Ruin India.” InPRA strives to provide a platform to a host of underrepresented voices in International Relations, not to publish your angst against “the man.” We despise one-sided arguments that fail to account for counter-arguments.
  • Steer clear of jargon. InPRA believes in making your ideas accessible to the widest possible audience.
  • Include a bio detailing your academic and/or professional background.
  • Don’t send us any article or proposal that begins with “Since the end of the Cold War…” or “In the wake of September 11…” Please don’t.

 Please feel free to email submissions to editor@inpra.in

[Adapted from the Foreign Policy Writer’s Guidelines]